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Contributed by Japanese American Citizens League, Arizona Chapter

For more than 75 years, the Arizona Chapter of the Japanese American Citizens League has served as a means of support to the community in regard to social issues and activism. Today, the Sara Hutchings Clardy Scholarship Awards continues to provide college scholarships each year for graduating high school seniors, an award established in 1962. The Chapter dedicated a new community building, located in Glendale, in 1977 and was also a founding member of the Matsuri Festival, the oldest Asian American festival in Arizona, established in 1984. In 1997, the Japanese Senior Center, a collaboration between JACL, YWCA, United Way, City of Glendale Community Development, and the Area Agency on Aging, Region One, was started through the dedicated efforts of the late John Kinoshita and Mary Tadano.

This collection features photographs from the collection of Mas Inoshita which range from a variety of social gatherings to include family photographs, citizenship ceremonies, organizational meetings, and others.

Congressional Gold Medal

On November 2, 2011 a concurrent resolution by both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate awarded Congressional Gold Medals to the U.S. Army's 100th Battalion, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team and the Military Intelligence Service for their extraordinary accomplishments in World War II. Due to their advancing age, many of the Japanese American veterans who served in these units were unable to attend the Congressional Gold Medal Ceremony in Washington D.C. Communities throughout the United States are now honoring their local Japanese American World War II veterans. JACL Arizona Chapter was honored to have Congressman Trent Franks present the replica Congressional Gold Medals to some of the veterans, spouses of veterans, and children of veterans at the 51st Anniversary of the Sara Hutchings Clardy Scholarship Awards Graduates Luncheon in 2012.

The Arizona Buddhist Temple

Origin of the temple dates back to 1933, when the temple was established through the dedication and sacrifice of Japanese-American pioneers. It has the distinction of being the oldest Buddhist temple in the state of Arizona. With the outbreak of World War II, the temple was closed when the leaders and minister were interned. In the post-War period, the temple was revitalized by Arizona residents and a large number of former evacuees of Japanese descent who had moved to the Phoenix area. In March of 1957, the temple was accidentally destroyed by fire. Services were temporarily established in a barracks that had been brought to Phoenix from the Gila River Relocation Center. The current temple building was constructed in 1961.

From Arizona JACL History, 75th Anniversary Banquet 2009 Brochure

 
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