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Browsing items in: Images from the Edward Curtis Collection at the Arizona Capitol Museum

(115 results)



Display: 20

    • Jicarilla Women, Portfolio 1, Plate 25

    • Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952
    • Jicarilla Indians
    • Women watching the races on their annual ceremonial or feast day. It will be observed that they are all dressed uniformly in garments cut after the primitive mode.
    • Tonovige - Havasupai, Portfolio 2, Plate 74

    • Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952
    • Havasupai Indians
    • This portrait was made in winter while a party of Havasupai were encamped in the high country above their cañon home. As a snowstorm was raging at the time, the woman's hair became dotted with flakes, as the picture reveals.
    • Geronimo - Apache, Portfolio 1, Plate 2

    • Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952
    • Apache Indians
    • This portrait of the historical old Apache was made in March, 1905. According to Geronimo's calculation he was at the time seventy-six years of age, thus making the year of his birth 1829. The picture was taken at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, the day...
    • Jicarilla Maiden, Portfolio 1, Plate 22

    • Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952
    • Jicarilla Indians
    • This pictures exceedingly well the typical Jicarilla women's dress: a cape of deerskin, beaded, a broad belt of black leather, a deerskin skirt, and the hair fastened at each side of the head with a large knot of yarn or cloth.
    • The Apache, Portfolio 1, Plate 7

    • Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952
    • Apache Indians
    • This picture might be titled "Life Primeval." It is the Apache as we would mentally picture him in the time of the Stone Age. It was made at a spot on Black river, Arizona, where the dark, still pool breaks into the laugh of a rapids.
    • The Burden Bearer - Pima, Portfolio 2, Plate 43

    • Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952
    • Pima Indians
    • This illustration shows the typical burden basket of the several Piman tribes of southern Arizona, called kiho in the Piman language. Their mythology relates that once the kiho was an animate being, but owing to disobedience of divine laws when the...
    • Sigesh - Apache, Portfolio 1, Plate 6

    • Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952
    • Apache Indians
    • This illustrates the girls' method of tying the hair previous to marriage. The ornament fastened to the hair in the back is made of leather, broad and round at the ends and narrow in the middle.
    • Cañon del Muerto - Navaho, Portfolio 1, Plate 29

    • Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952
    • Navajo Indians
    • This "Cañon of the Dead" is a branch of Cañon de Chelly, deriving its name from having been the scene of the massacre of a band of Navaho by a troop of Mexican soldiers.
    • Maricopa Girl, Portfolio 2, Plate 65

    • Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952
    • Maricopa Indians
    • The young Maricopa women affect the Mexican more than the Indian dress; but they are by no means unpicturesque in their garb of many colors as they gracefully bear their burden on their heads.
    • Desert Rovers - Apache, Portfolio 1, Plate 3

    • Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952
    • Apache Indians
    • The White Mountain Apache and the desert portion of their country. The picture was made on a gray day of early spring, when the Apache wear blankets as protection against the keen air of their mountain home.
    • A Snake Priest, Portfolio 12, Plate 418

    • Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952
    • Hopi Indians
    • The white markings, typifying the antelope, indicate that the subject is accoutred for the semi-final day of the Snake dance, when the public performance consists of the dance and the ceremonial race of the Antelope fraternity.
    • The Vanishing Race - Navaho, Portfolio 1, Plate 1

    • Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952
    • Navajo Indians
    • The thought which this picture is meant to convey is that the Indians as a race, already shorn in their tribal strength and stripped of their primitive dress, are passing into the darkness of an unknown future. Feeling that the picture expresses so...
    • Oratone of "The Potter," Portfolio 12, Plate 426

    • Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952
    • Hopi Indians
    • The oratone is of Nampeyo, potter of Hano and member of the Arizona Women’s Hall of Fame. An oratone is glass printed photographic print that is backed by a gold colored powder that is mixed with banana oil.

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